Impermanent Sangha Retreats

Peter Williams  has been teaching wilderness and nature retreats with Impermanent Sangha since 2010. He has practiced meditation for over 20 years in the Theravada and Tibetan Buddhist traditions, including many months of intensive silent retreat, and has taught mindfulness meditation in Boulder since 2003. Peter is certified as a Community Dharma Leader by Spirit Rock Meditation Center, and teaches retreats in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico. Peter also practices as a transpersonal psychotherapist in Boulder.


Peter has deep wilderness experience; he was an ecologist and wildlife biologist for 12 years, working with black bears, songbirds, beaver and wetlands, and also as an environmental educator for Massachusetts Audubon Society.

Johann Robbins  is the founder and director of Impermanent Sangha. He is a teacher of Mindfulness Meditation, also known as Insight or Vipassana. Johann has been meditating since 1974 with a focus on Mindfulness since 1997. He was asked to teach in 2008, and has completed the two year Community Dharma Leader teacher training program at Spirit Rock. His primary teachers include Shinzen Young and Eric Kolvig (who also helped found Impermanent Sangha and taught wilderness retreats for many years before his retirement). His style is light and open, yet focused and clear.


Johann started backpacking as a teenager, and deepened his spiritual journey on solo wilderness trips in his teens and twenties. His passion is teaching spiritual practice in nature, and he has guided and taught wilderness retreats in various traditions for over 25 years, including being a Vision Quest guide in the late 1990's. Johann founded Impermanent Sangha in 2002 and has led dozens of nature meditation retreats since then, including backpacking, camping, canoeing, and rafting.


Johann also offers a variety of meditation classes, daylongs, and weekend retreats in Boulder. To find out more or join his Boulder email list go to BoulderMindfulness.org.

Impermanent Sangha is a small non-profit dedicated to offering meditation retreats in nature and wilderness. One of a handful of such groups in the U.S., our organization and meditation retreats are run solely on a donation (Dana) basis. No one is paid for administering Impermanent Sangha, and the teachers and most staff receive only the Dana (donations) given by participants.

Impermanent Sanga Dharma Teachers & Wilderness Guides

Alice Robbins has been on retreat with Impermanent Sangha every year since the retreats began in 2002, and brings a wealth of knowledge and experience. For the past five years she has been managing food, logistics and cooking, providing wonderful meals for participants and teachers. Alice first started meditating in 1998, and is an experienced and avid boater, licensed river guide, camper, hiker, and musician, and has a deep connection to meditating in nature and wilderness. She is a "recovering" attorney, having recently retired from law, and now practices family law mediation. 


David Loy comes from both the Japanese Zen tradition and Insight. He began Zen practice in Hawaii in 1971 with Yamada Koun and Robert Aitken, and continued with Koun-roshi in Japan, where he lived for almost twenty years. He was authorized to teach in 1988 and leads retreats and workshops nationally and internationally in places such as at Spirit Rock, Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, Omega Institute, Cambridge Insight Center, Terre d’Eveil in Paris, and Dharma Gate in Budapest. David recently received an honorary PhD from his Alma Mater, Carleton College, for his years of work on socially engaged Buddhism.


David’s spiritual journey began when he lived for several years in a remote valley on Molokai, Hawaii. There he fell in love with backpacking, meditating in nature, and solo wilderness retreats. David is a well-known writer, whose books and articles have been translated into many languages. He is co-editor of A Buddhist Response to the Climate Emergency (Wisdom Publications) and has written many articles and blogs on Buddhism, ecology, and activism. He is very interested in the parallels between what Buddhism teaches about our personal predicament, and our current collective environmental predicament. David's writings and videos are available at davidloy.org and at ecobuddhism.org. This will be his fourth year with Impermanent Sangha.